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1979 Cold Case Resurfaces In Utah, Police Looking For Suspects

Utah Police announced today that they believe they have solved a 39-year-old murder. They are looking for two men who are suspects in the shooting death of a 54-year-old paraplegic man.

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There’s a staggering need for cheaper apartments around the state, but hardly any incentives to build them. Because those pricey apartments that you see downtown — they’re not sitting empty.

Young Living

Hundreds of mourners gathered in Juab County on Friday to celebrate the founder of the Utah-based essential oils company, Young Living. Gary Young died on May 12 following a series of strokes. 

 

Rawpixel/iStockphoto

You’ve probably heard about the GDP or those “best places to live” rankings. The Family Prosperity Index also factors in family life as a measure of well-being. And the latest rankings show Mountain West states doing pretty well.

 

Erik Neumann / KUER

Several hundred people gathered at Copper Mountain Middle School last night in Herriman to talk about a troubling spike in teen suicides.

Japan is considering hitting back against the U.S. in retaliation for America's steel and aluminum tariffs. A Japanese levy could hurt our region's agricultural industry.

Yellowstone National Park is moving forward with a plan to help create new herds of wild, genetically-pure bison across the country.

BSAUTER VIA ISTOCK

There might be such a thing as a Herriman Police Department by the end of this summer. The Herriman City Council voted Wednesday to cut ties with the Unified Police Department.

Screenshot / Josh Holt Facebook

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A Utah man imprisoned in Venezuela for two years without a trial is making an emotional plea for Americans' help getting out of a Caracas jail, saying Wednesday in a clandestinely shot video that his life was threatened during a riot in the country's most-notorious prison.

KUER

It’s no secret that rent around Salt Lake City is really high. And if you drive around downtown, you’ll see tons of new apartment complexes under construction. But the thing is, most Utahns can’t afford to live in them. At least, not according to the common definition of affordable housing: about 30 percent of your yearly income. There’s a staggering need for cheaper apartments around the state, but hardly any incentives to build them. Because those pricey places — they’re not sitting empty.

Lieutenant Governor's Office / Twitter

Thousands of missing signatures for a proposed ballot initiative were found Wednesday, and now they need to be counted. It’s the latest in a wild ride attempting to get the Count My Vote initiative on the November ballot.

Austen Diamond / KUER

Utah is already looking forward to an $80 million windfall from the federal tax overhaul, but there are a lot of other details to work out. 

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RadioWest

RBG

We’re talking RBG, aka Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, with filmmakers Betsy West and Julie Cohen. Their new documentary opens Friday in Salt Lake City theaters.

Announcing KUER's News Director

Investigative journalist Andrew Becker has been hired to direct the KUER newsroom.

Join us at KUER's Sustainer Day

June 1 at Ogden's Dinosaur Park!

RadioWest in the Red Rocks

May 30, 2018 | The Center for the Arts at Kayenta

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Podcast: More To Say

KUER

It’s no secret that rent around Salt Lake City is really high. And if you drive around downtown, you’ll see tons of new apartment complexes under construction. But the thing is, most Utahns can’t afford to live in them. At least, not according to the common definition of affordable housing: about 30 percent of your yearly income. There’s a staggering need for cheaper apartments around the state, but hardly any incentives to build them. Because those pricey places — they’re not sitting empty.

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NPR News

When Ariles López takes a break from her fruit stall and begins to describe her life in Venezuela, there is a moment when she chokes up and begins to cry.

That will not come as a surprise, when you hear her story.

López, who's 47, is among those Venezuelans who say they will vote in Sunday's election, despite a widely held view that it's a fraudulent exercise calculated to keep President Nicolás Maduro in power.

Foods that contains genetically modified ingredients will soon have a special label.

We recently got the first glimpse of what that label might look like, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture released its proposed guidelines.

It's a club no one wants to join, but many Americans these days find themselves automatically eligible for the "Bill of the Month" club.

Kaiser Health News and NPR began collecting people's health care bills for examination early this year. We have waded through roughly 500 submissions, choosing just one each month to decode and dissect. (If you'd like to submit your story or bill, you can do it here.)

Updated at 9:44 a.m.

This week in the Russia investigations: The Senate Judiciary Committee dumps documents about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting, the special counsel's office celebrates its first birthday and the GOP escalates its war against the Justice Department.

The enemy within

After chapters on "wiretaps," eavesdropping, "unmasking" and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the new hotness this week was confidential sources.

When Muhammad Zaman came to the United States in 1996, he asked around for pharmacy recommendations. Friends kept telling him the same thing: filling a prescription at Walgreens was as good as filling it at CVS. Duane Reade was as safe as the Main Street drug store in any small town. The medicines sold in all of them would contain the chemicals and active ingredients that their labels claimed.

He was shocked. That wasn't the case in his native Pakistan, he says.

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